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PGW Displays Sungate Glass During SAE Meeting and D.C. Auto Show

Representatives from Pittsburgh Glass Works (PGW) were on-hand in Washington, D.C., this week, where the company demonstrated the benefits of its Sungate infrared reflective (IR) automotive glass. The PGW exhibit was one of several table-top demonstrations at the SAE International Government meeting held this week in conjunction with the Washington Auto Show.

The glass is developed on the premise that reflecting infrared rays is more energy-efficient than absorbing them-and this was particularly fitting at this year's event, as both the auto show and SAE event were filled with "green" technologies. The Auto Show included an entire pavilion of "green cars," and several manufacturers highlighted hybrids and other energy-efficient vehicles in their own booths.

The glass is made with nanotechnology that reflects the infrared rays aay from the glass, while still allowing visible light requirements to be met. However, PGW officials are quick to note that this technology is not new-but is becoming more popular.

"This technology has been around for 20 years," said PGW's Pete Dishart. He noted that several manufacturers utilize the glass, including Daimler-Chrysler and Mercedes-Benz.

"It's used in the [Mercedes] S-class," he added.

Dishart was accompanied at the show by Dick Heilman, PGW vice president of marketing and research and development, and Mukesh Rustagi, director of strategic project management.

In conjunction with the table-top displays, SAE held a variety of meetings, including several speakers from the National Traffic Highway and Safety Administration (NHTSA), about a variety of automotive safety issues.

The Washington Auto Show continues through the weekend.

CLICK HERE for more information on the Washington Auto Show.

Stay tuned to™ for more information from the Washington Auto Show in the coming days, and for video footage of the PGW display.

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