Minnesota Bill That Would Change Definition of Insurance Adjuster is Dead

A Minnesota house and senate bill that would widen the scope of those included in the definition of an insurance adjuster has been killed. The bill would have allowed those who report claims to practice as adjusters without a license, in turn limiting the Minnesota Department of Commerce’s authority. However, organized efforts from local auto glass shops have brought the amendment to a halt.

According to the bill, “a person who reports claims information to a policyholder on behalf of and at the direction of an insurer; disburses claims payments on behalf of an insurer to a policyholder or a policyholder’s vendor; or provides claims to market data to insurers,” would not be required to have a license.

In response, local glass shops lobbied to prevent the Senate bill from having a hearing, which prevented the bill from moving forward. While the House bill did have a hearing, the bill couldn’t move forward without the Senate hearing, rendering it dead.

“Safelite was attempting to avoid litigation with the Minnesota Department of Commerce (DOC) by sponsoring a bill that would allow them to act as an insurance adjuster, without having to be licensed. Had it been enacted into law, Safelite could say or do almost anything to consumers without oversight from the DOC,” says Rick Rosar, president of Rapid Glass.

“Due to a united grassroots effort from Minnesota auto glass shops and an unprecedented amount of support from the Minnesota Glass Association (MGA), its lobbyist Sara Psick and assistance from the Independent Glass Association (IGA), we were able to protect consumers and small businesses from the bullying tactics of Safelite,” Rosar added.

Safelite could not be reached for comment.

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1 Response to Minnesota Bill That Would Change Definition of Insurance Adjuster is Dead

  1. Pingback: Minnesota Glass Association Commends Successful Efforts in Amending Bill | glassBYTEs.com

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