Proposal that Would Require Insurer Windshield Inspections Passes Florida Senate Committee

A proposed amendment to Florida legislation that would require an insurer’s inspection before a windshield is repaired or replaced has been cleared by a Senate committee.

The bill, which is identical in language to the House bill proposed by Rep. Rene Plasencia, was introduced by Sen. Dorothy Hukill as an effort to combat the state’s assignment of benefits (AOB) abuse, which insurers claim has caused the spike in the number of lawsuits against them by auto glass shops in recent years.

The proposed amendment reads, “A policy under this section may require an inspection of the damaged windshield of a covered motor vehicle before the windshield repair or replacement is authorized by the insurer.”

Before the hearing concluded, however, two committee members made revisions to the amendment.

Sen. Greg Steube revised the bill to include a deadline for the inspection, which would be performed by a licensed adjuster who is also an employee of the vehicle owner’s insurance company. From the moment the claim is filed, the insurer would have 24 hours to complete the inspection.

Sen. Rob Bradley also added language that would allow the auto glass shop to complete the repair or replacement without an inspection if the windshield’s damage compromised the vehicle’s structural integrity or would leave the driver susceptible to a ticket because it violated the state’s law.

The bill has been referred to two other committees.

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2 Responses to Proposal that Would Require Insurer Windshield Inspections Passes Florida Senate Committee

  1. robert says:

    WOW. Thank You Rob and Greg. Those are some good common sense revisions.
    We can see that the Insurance companies don’t own ALL representatives. Good Job.

  2. dave says:

    So is the revised Senate bill still the same as what was introduced to House? Where is the requirement? The bill says MAY require which leaves it in the hands of the insurer. Some already require an inspection. My suspicion is that a TPA is really behind this with the idea that their tech would be the “inspector”, not the insurance industry. There are not enough licensed adjusters in the state to fufill this burden, especially if it must be an employee of the insurance company.
    The added language effectively kills the proposal anyway as ANY damage to a windshield violates state law and is ticketable. Additionally any manufacturer would certainly go on record as stating that ANY windshield damage may compromise a vehicle’s structural integrity.
    I agree with Robert. Thank You Rob and Greg.

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