Bill Would Prohibit Subscriptions for Vehicle Features Such as ADAS

A bill recently introduced by assemblypersons Paul Moriarty and Joe Danielsen of New Jersey Districts 4 and 17, respectively, would prohibit manufacturers from requiring subscriptions for certain motor vehicle features.

The bill would make it unlawful for manufacturers or dealers to offer subscriptions for features utilizing components or hardware already installed in the vehicle at the time of purchase.

The bill would make it unlawful for manufacturers or dealers to offer subscriptions for features utilizing components or hardware already installed in the vehicle at the time of purchase. Those features are defined as convenience or safety functions including not only amenities such as heated seats but also safety features such as driver assistance.

“Car companies assert that a subscription-based business model would provide more choice to the consumer, but the practice requires installing all of the necessary components and hardware on the vehicle before the consumer decides to subscribe to the feature, which will likely raise the purchase price for every consumer, whether they intend to subscribe to the feature or not,” say the sponsors.

William Wallace, manager of safety policy at Consumer Reports, says companies should not be permitted to deactivate “proven, effective, well-functioning safety systems,” including in instances of expired subscriptions.

“Instead, these systems should come as standard equipment across the board,” writes Consumer Reports. “In fact, Consumer Reports believes that automatic emergency braking (AEB) with pedestrian detection, forward collision warning (FCW), and blind spot warning (BSW) should come standard on all trim levels of all models.”

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1 Response to Bill Would Prohibit Subscriptions for Vehicle Features Such as ADAS

  1. Dave C says:

    Hopefuily more States will be working on forward-thinking legislation with regard to ADAS features. It’s just a matter of time before vehicle connectivity within a wireless infrastructure will be a critical part of autonomous and semi-autonomous features. I could certainly see manufacturers wanting to require subscriptions to enable wireless ADAS services.

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