Legislative Update: Mississippi Auto Glass Deductible Bill Dies in Committee, While Arizona House Considers Bill That Some Say Could Remove Zero-Deductible Option
February 3, 2010

A Mississippi bill that would have made it so that deductibles would not apply to auto glass damage covered by insurance policies in the state has died in the state senate's insurance committee. The bill had been introduced by Sen. Robert Jackson (D), in an effort to help consumers in a state with rough roads and many broken windshields.

However, Jackson told glassBYTEs.com™/AGRR magazine last week he feared the bill wouldn't fare well, citing the insurance committee chair's ties to the insurance industry.(CLICK HERE for related story.)

Meanwhile, the Arizona House is considering a bill that would change the state's no-deductible policy for auto glass so that this might be optional.

The state's current law reads as follows:

"Any insurer writing private passenger automobile insurance which includes comprehensive coverage for motor vehicle damage shall provide at the option of the insured complete coverage for the repair or replacement of all damaged safety equipment without regard to any deductible."

However, if the bill, H.B. 2464, passes, the law would now read:

"Any insurer writing private passenger automobile insurance that includes comprehensive coverage for motor vehicle damage may offer coverage that provides at the option of the insured complete coverage for the repair or replacement of all damaged safety equipment without regard to any deductible."

Industry representative Cindy Ketcherside, formerly owner and president of JC's Glass in Phoenix, spoke before the Senate's banking and insurance committee earlier this week in opposition to the bill. (CLICK HERE for related story.)

"Using the words 'shall provide' as written in the current bill gives the consumer more choices," saysKetcherside. "It mandates that the insurance industry must provide a zero-glass deductible coverage for glass, along with a $100 and $500 (or even higher) option. By changing the words to 'may provide,' the insurance companies will still offer $100 and $500 deductibles, but what will be eliminated is the option for the consumer to choose a zero-glass deductible."

Ketcherside also pointed out that 59 percent of consumers in Arizona currently utilize the zero-glass deductible option.


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