Tag Archives: Auto Glass Journal

TODAY’S BLOG: A Look at Full-Strip Procedures

“Last week we looked at tool options for trimming back the urethane bead to the level suggested by the adhesive manufactures (1/16th on an inch) when replacing a windshield. This week we’ll address the procedures that must be employed to make sure the glass is solidly bonded and the installation is leak-free.”—Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Tools for Stripping Existing Urethane

“One of the most difficult skills a new technician needs to master is how to trim back the existing urethane to the proper point. The typical advice, used in the industry for decades, is to trim the existing bead to 1-2 mm or a 1/16 of an inch. Though we have all heard this phrase used frequently, most people don’t trim back the existing bead and then measure the thickness of the urethane left behind to make sure that it was exactly a 1/16th of an inch. If the bead is a 1/32 or 3/16 of an inch, is that wrong? No it is not.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Visiting IIHS

“Last week I was invited to tour the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) complex in Ruckersville, Va. All I can say is wow. What an impressive place.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Should We Replace Laminated Sidelites with Tempered Glass?

“In May of 2014, I posted an article addressing the dilemma of whether the use of laminated sidelites were a safety device or a performance device. Recently this same issue came up again. Evidently, some customers have asked an automotive glass shop to install a tempered door glass in place of the broken laminated part due to the lower cost. Should we be installing tempered in place of laminated? Is this a safety concern?” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Setting a True Goal

“There was a thread on the glassBYTEs.com™/AGRR™ magazine forum in which someone asked how to prepare the pinchweld for a windshield installation on the new aluminum Ford F-150. I found the written instructions from Ford for that vehicle and posted them.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: New Nissan Directives on Windshield Replacement

“I received information recently from an AllData representative that caused me to do a double take. Did you know that Nissan is requiring that the inside rearview mirror be replaced when the windshield is replaced on four of their most popular models?” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: A Report on ADAS

“Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) have plagued and perplexed our industry for the last few years.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Mastering the Cold Knife

“You may be thinking cold knives? Why is Bob writing about cold knives when there are power tools and wire-out tools that are taking over the automotive glass removal process? The answer is because it hasn’t happened yet, as much as tool companies and safety advocates would like to make that case. The cold knife is still the most popular tool for glass removal.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Pulling Cowls: Let’s End the Debate

“In July 2012, I wrote a blog post about the debate between pulling cowls vs. tucking the glass when replacing windshields. The question came up again recently.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Part 2: Protect Yourself Against Injury

“Last week we talked about the protection every technician should do to prolong his or her career and reduce the chances of pain and injury. This week let’s talk about protecting the vehicle from possible damage.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Protect Yourself Against Injury

“An important aspect of automotive glass installation that is overlooked at our peril is protection. Protection is a term that can be used in two different contexts. One, the protection against bodily injury and two, protecting the vehicle from possible damage during installation. Both are important steps for the well-being of the technician and the successful and profitable conclusion of the installation.” —Bob Beranek

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“The Cog” in the Automotive Wheel

“I would like to share a Honda commercial sent to me by my friend Mark Daniels, a technical advisor for GGG-Gold Glass Group, AEGIS Tools International Inc. and other companies in the automotive glass industry. This video, which ran in Europe several years ago, is called ‘The Cog’ and it intrigued me because it contains several references to automotive glass. The video is the type of ‘Rube Goldberg’ invention which takes a simple task and creates a series of complicated steps to accomplish the action.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Training Myths

“A comment recently made on the glassBYTEs.com™/AGRR™ magazine Forum has raised a question we should all consider. In full disclosure, the comment was made regarding Auto Glass University (AGU), a training program I own, although this post is not meant as a commercial. I am giving you my opinion on the art of automotive glass training. I hope it can be used by everyone in the industry to be more effective in their training of new technicians, no matter where or by whom the training is conducted.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Fuel Economy and Automotive Glass

“Last weekend I read about the Obama administration’s negotiated agreements with auto companies on new fuel economy standards as dictated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In my classes I mention the fact that many of the new technological advances in automotive design and features are directly related to that agreement negotiated with the carmakers.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Automatic Braking and the Glass Industry

“I read with interest the article recently printed in Automotive News and linked on glassBYTEs.com™ “Automatic Braking Standard: ‘New Model’ or ‘Safety Sellout’?” The article outlines the debate between having regulatory mandated braking systems in new vehicles versus a voluntary buy-in by carmakers. Either way, this change is coming and the automotive glass industry needs to be prepared.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Distribution Dilemmas

“A couple of years ago I explained the history behind the (often repeated) statement that 70 percent of the automotive glass installed in the country was done wrong. Recently, I gave a training course in Baton Rouge, La., that gave me some more insight on this problem.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Educating the Consumer

“Last week’s blog was based on feedback about my post ‘Setting the Standard for Safe Automotive Glass Installations.’ I discussed the ease of entering the AGRR industry and the ramifications.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Riding the (Automotive Glass) Range

“A few weeks back I wrote a post called Setting the Standard for Safe Automotive Glass Installations. I talked about Auto Glass Safety Council™ Registered Member Companies that were frustrated with the quality of automotive glass work in their market. One took it to his state government for licensing possibilities, and the other owner was frustrated when their competitor passed their AGSC audit but reverted back to bad installation habits immediately after the auditors left. This blog post had several comments and they centered on beliefs that I thought should be discussed.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Callbacks Part Two: Benefit of Tracking Callbacks

“In my last blog, I suggested that tracking callbacks leads to better management and quality control. Today I want to reinforce that argument with examples and explain how you can use the tracking data collected.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Tracking Callbacks

“In some areas of the country when a customer calls you back to re-do your work it is called ‘warranty’ work or ‘re-work’ but here in Wisconsin we call them callbacks. Obviously, none of us want to have callbacks occur. They cost us money and customer ill-will. It takes up time that could be better spent on putting in parts that we get paid for. However, callbacks can be a benefit to your company if handled correctly.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: AGSC™ Retreat

“Next week I will be heading for the winter committee meetings of the Auto Glass Safety Council™ (AGSC). This year it will be held in Orlando, Fla., where the warm and sunny weather will be greatly appreciated. Although I rarely have time to get out and enjoy the climate, it is still nice to be away from frigid Wisconsin for a short while.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Trailblazing

“In my training courses, I typically explain that my instruction is not vehicle specific. With all the old and new vehicles in the marketplace, it would take months instead of days to teach automotive glass installation one vehicle at a time. Instead, I teach technicians how to trail blaze. Considering this is what he does every day, it makes all the sense in the world.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: New Year’s Resolutions for Automotive Glass Shops

“Are you beginning the New Year with an annual declaration of resolutions you plan to achieve? Many people do, and every year we usually fall short in achieving our goals. From my personal experience, I know that vows to lose weight, quit smoking, eat better or exercise more many times fall short. The problem with resolutions is that we set the bar way too high for our will power to overcome.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Recalibration Bowl

“It is that time of year again when the college football bowl season begins and the NFL starts their road to the Super Bowl. During the season, our teams raise our hopes through inspired plays and then deflate some of those hopes with bad performances (with the possible except of the Carolina Panthers). We have cheered when our teams played well and cried when they fumbled the ball. We understand that wins and losses are part of the game.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’s BLOG: Subaru Extends Windshield Warranty

“I never knew there was such a thing as an OEM windshield warranty. But apparently there is. And now I’ve learned that one has been extended. I received the head’s up from one of my friends at American AutoGlass Administrators in the United Kingdom, namely Brian Butterworth. He passed along a notice sent to Subaru owners concerning a problem with the original equipment (OE) windshield equipped with a wiper park heater. The warranty on the windshields was extended from three years or 36,000 miles to five years and unlimited miles for a defect in the manufacturing of the OE windshield. According to the letter, the glass is manufactured by Carlex.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Prepping a Windshield with a Rain Sensor

“I had an inquiry recently from one of our Auto Glass University graduates. His question reminded me that there are some common problems that technicians should address when prepping a windshield with a rain sensor.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Tesla Autopilot Gets an Overnight Upgrade

“This weekend I read about a new technology from Tesla called Autopilot. This technology is not a fully autonomous vehicle; it is more like an advanced cruise control. It is designed to assist in the act of driving, much like a pilot is assisted when he engages the autopilot once the plane is airborne and at cruising altitude. With this software upgrade, once your Tesla is on a well-marked roadway and cruising at the speed of the traffic, the Autopilot can be set and the driver monitors the trip just like a pilot does during a flight.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Be Cautious of Advice Handed Out on Websites

“My friend, Steven Rossetti at American Auto Glass Administrators in Rhode Island, recently emailed me a link to a website that professes that automotive glass replacement is so easy anyone can do it. The site advises that, ‘You may also prefer to replace the windshield yourself rather than spend the time and money to take it in to an approved auto technician.’” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Let’s Define Pinchwelds

“For as long as I can remember, the term pinchweld has been used to describe the part of the vehicle on which we bond the glass. During my many years of training, defining a pinchweld was one of the most important preliminary steps to explaining automotive glass installation.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Calibration Calculations

“Since I returned from the Auto Glass Week™, I keep thinking about the seminars given on Advanced Driver Assist Systems (ADAS). Although I have addressed this subject in the past, it is becoming obvious that the questions are not going away. ADAS will continue to be a problem until we know what to do for ourselves and our customers. This technology is so new that many dealerships don’t know what to do.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Let’s Talk about OEM Glass and Calibration

“Since the introduction of Advanced Driver Assist Systems (ADAS), the need for aftermarket glass replacement companies to use OEM glass has increased substantially. Of course, auto dealers have claimed for years that OEM glass was necessary for the proper operation of the many electronic systems that utilize the glass for mounting or delivery. Is this true?” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: The Case of the FW791

“I have another mystery that I am hoping you can help, especially my friends and colleagues in Europe.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Part 7: ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard 003-2015 Changes

“The last of the changes to the ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard 003-2015 is, in my opinion, the most important. Without education and training a technician doesn’t know how to do the job right and will be unable to follow a standard that doesn’t make sense to him.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Part 6: ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard 003-2015 Changes

“Part six in our series of the ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard 003-2015 changes for 2015 fall under the ‘additional requirements’ heading.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: What are Dams?

“I am interrupting my series on the ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard 003-2015 to discuss the use and the slow obsolescence of (some types) of glass dams. A glass dam is a device that holds back a material from going where it is not supposed to go. Dams in our industry are used in three different ways: as a positioning device, an aesthetic feature to hide unappealing material or as a sound barrier between the engine noise and the quiet interior.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Part 4: ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard 003-2015 Changes

Part four in our series of ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard 003-2015 changes is related to adhesives and their importance to the safety of the installation.

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TODAY’S BLOG: Part 3: ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard 003-2015 Changes

“The next series of changes for the new ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard 003-2015 standard is under the 5.0 heading ‘Selection of Glass and Retention Systems’ which falls under the Product Performance part of our scope.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Part 2: The New ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard 003-2015

“One part of the newly published ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard 003-2015 remains the same as the prior version. It is so important that I call it the ‘Golden Rule’ of the Standard.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: The New ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard 003-2015

“As many of you already know, the ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard 003-2015 has been revised and edited to meet the new issues that affect our industry. The official new name is ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard 003-2015. The 003 is the third version accepted by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and 2015 is the year it was accepted and published.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Leave 1-2 Millimeters of Existing Bead

“Did you ever wonder why we are instructed to “leave 1-2 mm of existing bead” when replacing a windshield? I did, so over the years, whenever I talked to an adhesive manufacturer’s representative, I asked the purpose for that recommendation. Most said it was to prevent damage to the body of the vehicle. However, there are a few other benefits to leaving a little existing urethane attached.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: The Automotive Glass Technician Competition Is Coming

“It is time again to register for the Automotive Glass Technician competition (AGTO). This nationally recognized competition for quality automotive glass installation is being held at Auto Glass Week™ 2015 in Reno, Nev., on October 1-2, 2015. Technicians from around the world come to earn the title of “The Best Auto Glass Technician.” I have been honored to be a judge for this competition since its inception and I am privileged to do it again this year.” —Bob Beranek

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TODAY’S BLOG: Gravity Stops

“Many modern day vehicles have eliminated or reinvented the gravity stop. What is a gravity stop? In my day we used to call them setting blocks, but the more accurate term is gravity stops. The gravity stop is a device that stops the glass from slipping off the freshly applied adhesive bead. It is needed immediately after setting the glass into the opening when the adhesive is still in its liquid state. Once the adhesive is cured to the point of holding the weight of the glass, the stop is no longer needed.” —Bob Beranek

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